Group Portrait, Martello Tower, Sandycove, Dublin, Ireland, April 2007

 

 

A Literary Guide to Southwest England was conceived and created as part of the year-long 2006-07 Kenyon-Exeter Seminar.  Each of the eleven seminar students were junior English majors from Kenyon College (Gambier, Ohio, U.S.A.), studying at the University of Exeter in Devon, U.K., as members of Kenyon’s study abroad program.  Their instructor is a Kenyon professor, in residence for the year as program director. 

 

Our year-long sojourn in the West Country allowed us to complete the library and archival research, museum tours, fieldwork and site visits that inform each page on this web site.   All students completed one, and more typically three or more, visits to sites of direct relevance to their author and his or her texts.  All photographs are the students’ original work and each “local route” has been walked personally by its author.  Given a standard content requirement, each student author has individually researched, composed, and designed the web pages dedicated to his or her particular writer.  

 

Credit for the creation of specific writer pages is as follows:

 

            Jane Austen                Emily Kliever

            Arthurian Poets           Shea Davis

            R.D. Blackmore          Isaac Miller

            S. Baring-Gould          Anna Hale

            Agatha Christie          Christopher Chanock

            S.T. Coleridge             Siddharth Bansal

            Arthur Conan Doyle   James Miller

            John Fowles                Richard Glennon

            Thomas Hardy             Katie Hickey and Clare Keating

            Eden Phillpotts            Andi Paul

 

The "Gazetteer" was created by Kim McMullen. Alan Narovec

instructed us in Dreamweaver and acted as Web Master. The copyright

for the content of each page, including original photographic images, text,

and design elements is held by the individual authors. All rights are

reserved.

 

A Literary Guide to Southwest England was sponsored in part by a Teaching Initiative Grant from Kenyon College.  We are exceedingly grateful for the help of countless librarians, tour guides, and museum docents, but we especially want to acknowledge the help of Melanie Maksin, Mary Stettner, and Jason Bennett (of Kenyon’s Library and Information Service) and of Patricia Milton, James Turner, and the rest of the staff at the wonderful Devon and Exeter Institution.  We wish also to thank the Ordnance Survey of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for kind permission to reproduce several of their maps.